History

From WWII to the present day – the Acquasanta’s myth

On June 4, 1944 General Clark liberated Rome and after a few days golfing resumed.  The Club was now ‘invaded’ by festive Allies, many of them golf players. Lord Alexander, Field Marshal Montgomery, General Clark and General Patton all visited Acquasanta. Officers and Members mixed well and club life restarted with the carefree joy that was the hallmark of the post-war period, although war was still raging on in the north of Italy.

During the awaited post-war period, Acquasanta became one of the favored centers of sporting Roman socialites.

It is said that one day of October 1946, at dawn, club members Count Piero M. and Baron Carlo A. dueled over the love of a lady, crossing their sabers by the Club’s pool. Their seconds suspended the fight at first blood, preserving the honor of the contestants.

After the war the club, generally intact, started to live again and became a reference point both for passionate Roman golfers and for members of the growing international community, especially English and American.

The economic recovery gave a strong thrust to the Club. Champions from Acquasanta dominated Italian amateur golf, most prominently Franco Bevione and Isa Goldschmid.

Under the patronage of instructor Pietrino Manca, Acquasanta became the training center for most professionals (usually former caddies), which would later move to the new clubs developing in the north of Italy.

A distinguishing feature of Acquasanta is that its work force (green keepers, changing room staff, barmen and waiters) is mostly composed of former caddies, people who know and love the club and the game of golf.  There has always been a unique relationship between members and caddies, which were all dubbed with nicknames.  The latter, with typically roman wit, created colorful monikers for most of the members, known to almost everyone but strictly ignored by those concerned.

At the end of 1967 also King Constantine of Greece, taking refuge in Rome after the coup of the colonels headed by Papadopulos, found relief from his troubles on the course of Acquasanta.

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In 1968 the Club received the highest national honor in Italian sports, La stella d’oro al merito sportivo, for the achievements of its members.

In the same year the general assembly approved the construction of a new Club-house (the fourth and current one). The project was designed by the members Prof. Renato Venturi and Guido di Carpegna.

It cost Lit. 500 million and was inaugurated on the 11th of November 1971. After 30 years it replaced the building donated by Galeazzo Ciano, while maintaining the terrace and the pool.

The two buildings used as the first and second club-house still stand, are well maintained and are part of the facilities of the club.

Following a difficult negotiation managed by the President Ermanno Guani and the lawyer Alberto Federici , the General Meeting of June 22nd 1980 approved the purchase of the club grounds from the Marquis Gerini, who succeeded the Torlonias. Finally, after several attempts starting from the early ’30s, the members had achieved the dream of owning the property of their club.

The club celebrated its 110th anniversary in the summer of 2013. The membership is made up, in many cases, by third and in a few instances fourth generation members. The Acquasanta Golf Club succeeds at renewing itself, still from the same roots, on the same “links”, on the same water and landscape from which it started.

The Acquasanta golf course as it was originally planned, and executed by the Marquis Vanni, Mr. Arthur Flach, Mr. R. C. Young and Mr. Hector De Castro, is still one of the most rewarding and elegant golf courses in Italy. In its own way it is perfect, and just like an old painting it can only be preserved and restored, but not changed.

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From WWII to the present day – the Acquasanta’s myth Reviewed by on 6 July 2016 .

On June 4, 1944 General Clark liberated Rome and after a few days golfing resumed.  The Club was now ‘invaded’ by festive Allies, many of them golf players. Lord Alexander, Field Marshal Montgomery, General Clark and General Patton all visited Acquasanta. Officers and Members mixed well and club life restarted with the carefree joy that

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